Tell the CPSC: Ban dangerous toys and products!

Remember last year’s uproar over tainted toys? You probably thought the problem was fixed. But it isn’t – dangerous toys are still on the shelves this holiday season. In fact, you likely will be able to find unsafe products well into 2009.

Earlier this year, with your help, Public Citizen succeeded in making tough new product safety measures the law of the land. The new law requires that toys and infant products be tested before they’re sold, bans lead and phthalates (a harmful chemical) from toys and calls for the creation of a consumer complaint database, among other vital reforms.

In 2007, we saw an unprecedented number of recalls of hazardous and deadly items. We passed stronger product safety measures to put a stop to these unavoidable injuries and deaths.

But the CPSC, which was charged with implementing these reforms, and its infamously pro-business chair, Nancy Nord, are working to undermine the law. Retailers can still stockpile and continue selling dangerous products as long as they were manufactured before the ban date (Feb. 10, 2009). And the agency is refusing to start work on the database.

Maureen, this is unacceptable! Over the past month we’ve been talking about our Citizens’ Agenda for the next administration. Ensuring the safety of toys and other products is a crucial part of this agenda.

Public Citizen will not stop working until these reforms are carried out fully. Just last week, we joined with the Natural Resources Defense Council to sue the CPSC to enforce the ban on toxic toys.

We have a lot of work ahead, and we need your help.

The Commission must implement the law and Congress must provide enough money for the agency to do its job. We also need to ensure that President-elect Obama’s transition team immediately replaces Nancy Nord with someone who will look out for consumers.

Please support Public Citizen today and help us protect your safety and the safety of our children.

You can also support us by voting for this cause as one of the top ideas for change in America at Change.org.