Powerful Elections Message from California

village-1357192_640At a time when public approval of Congress remains near all-time lows, revisiting campaign finance laws is critical. Party officials have recommended members spend roughly twice as much time fundraising as they do on the floor or in committee. U.S. House members raise on average $2,400 every single day of their term. U.S. Senators will raise roughly twice that.

These campaign spending increases are reflected at the state and local level as well. For example, a single local school board race in California resulted in over $3.5 million in inside and outside spending. The tides may be shifting, however.

California is now poised to enact a law which would lift the state’s ban on publicly financed campaigns. SB 1107 passed with bipartisan backing last week. It gives local and state government to option stick with the current system or switch to public financing. The bill requires public financing laws have a dedicated funding source and that funds be “available to all qualified, voluntarily participating candidates for the same office without regard to incumbency or political party preference.”

Public Citizen’s members in California sent over 1,200 letters to their assembly members in the days leading up to the vote. All that’s left is for Gov. Jerry Brown to sign the bill.  You can contact his office at (916) 445-2841 and ask him to sign SB 1107.

Voters in California will have further opportunity to express their frustration with the current system when Proposition 59 appears on their ballots this November. It is a resolution that calls on California legislators to do everything they can to overturn Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission. Yesterday, the Sacramento Bee endorsed the measure, which is backed by groups such as California Common Cause, calPIRG, Courage Campaign and others.