Learn more about our policy experts.

Media Contacts

Angela Bradbery, Director of Communications
w. (202) 588-7741
c. (202) 503-6768
abradbery@citizen.org, Twitter

Don Owens, Deputy Director of Communications
w. (202) 588-7767

Karilyn Gower, Press Officer
w. (202) 588-7779

David Rosen, Press Officer, Regulatory Affairs
w. (202) 588-7742

Other Important Links

Press Release Database
Citizen Vox blog
Texas Vox blog
Consumer Law and Policy blog
Energy Vox blog
Eyes on Trade blog

Follow us on Twitter


Aug. 11, 2011

REINS Act Is Priority for Energy Industry, Lobbying Records Show 

Contrary to Claims, Bill to Undermine the Nation’s Regulatory System Is Not Being Pushed to Benefit Small Businesses

 WASHINGTON, D.C. – Although congressional proponents of the Republicans’ signature anti-regulatory measure claim that it is designed to help small businesses, lobbying records indicate that it stands to have the most impact on the energy industry, a new Public Citizen analysis shows.

Lobbying disclosure records show that the electric utility industry has weighed in on the REINS Act far more than any other industry. The 48 organizations that reported lobbying on the act in the first half of 2011 include 26 energy industry companies or trade associations, including 20 from the electric utility industry and three from the coal industry.

Formally named the Regulations from the Executive in Need of Scrutiny Act, H.R.10 was introduced by Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) and Rep. Geoff Davis (R-Ky.). It would require congressional approval of all major federal rules within 70 legislative days. Without approval, the rules would be tabled until the next Congress. If enacted, the bill will mire these rules in congressional gridlock and undermine the nation’s system of health, safety, financial and environmental safeguards, Public Citizen maintains.

REINS could significantly benefit electric utilities, which have strenuously objected to many rules proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency.

“The REINS Act should be called the Rewarding Energy Industry, Not Small Business Act,” said Amit Narang, regulatory policy advocate at Public Citizen’s Congress Watch division. “Assuming that industries’ lobbying budgets reflect their priorities, it is clear that the REINS Act is a significant priority for the energy industry, particularly electric utilities, but not for small businesses.”

“After the BP oil spill disaster, the Massey mine explosion and the 2008 crash of Wall Street, the last thing we need is to hamstring federal agencies that are working to protect people from the effects of corporate greed,” said Lisa Gilbert, deputy director of Public Citizen’s Congress Watch division. “The REINS Act would undermine the ability of agencies to keep our air and water clean, our workplaces safe and our financial system sound. When it comes to protection, the public deserves better.”

To read the analysis and see which utilities lobbied on REINS, visit http://www.citizen.org/Page.aspx?pid=5002.


Copyright © 2016 Public Citizen. Some rights reserved. Non-commercial use of text and images in which Public Citizen holds the copyright is permitted, with attribution, under the terms and conditions of a Creative Commons License. This Web site is shared by Public Citizen Inc. and Public Citizen Foundation. Learn More about the distinction between these two components of Public Citizen.

Public Citizen, Inc. and Public Citizen Foundation


You can support the fight for greater government and corporate accountability through a donation to either Public Citizen, Inc., or Public Citizen Foundation, Inc.

Public Citizen lobbies Congress and federal agencies to advance Public Citizen’s mission of advancing government and corporate accountability. When you make a contribution to Public Citizen, you become a member of Public Citizen, showing your support and entitling you to benefits such as Public Citizen News. Contributions to Public Citizen are not tax-deductible.

Public Citizen Foundation focuses on research, public education, and litigation in support of our mission. By law, the Foundation can engage in only very limited lobbying. Contributions to Public Citizen Foundation are tax-deductible.