What's New


August 14, 2014 - LaRepublica.pe - Sobregasto en medicamentos (en español)

July 17, 2014 - NPR: Evaluating The Benefits And Costs Of Patents (links to npr.org)

July 15, 2014 - Livemint: Bombay HC upholds Nexavar compulsory licensing decision (links to livemint.com)

July 14, 2014 - MSF: TPP: Still a Terrible Deal for Poor People's Health(links to huffingtonpost.com)

July 7, 2014 - Op-ed: The TPP could be a blow to public health (links to ottawacitizen.com)

June 25, 2014 - Video of Global Access to Medicines Program Director Peter Maybarduk's presentation at the Transatlantic Consumer Dialogue event on IP in TAFTA

June 23, 2014 - Videos, summaries, photos and more from the June 5 briefing on the Eli Lilly v. Canada investor-state case and secondary pharmaceutical patents

For older news, visit the Access to Medicines news archive

The Medicines Patent Pool

In December 2009, UNITAID created the Medicines Patent Pool (MPP) as a separate entity to focus on increasing access to HIV medicines in developing countries. The Pool’s objective is to facilitate licensing agreements with patent holders and generic pharmaceutical manufacturers. Unlike state-based compulsory licenses or patent oppositions, MPP licenses can reach many countries at once, potentially changing the global access picture for a given drug.

Public Citizen sees the success of the MPP as an invaluable element in our fight to expand access to medicines. But for the Medicines Patent Pool to truly work, those of us in the global health community must continue to press for conditions which allow it to succeed. The MPP has the potential to be a game-changer for global health which contributes to saving millions of lives, but it can’t do it alone.



May 15, 2014 - Boehringer Ingelheim's response to Public Citizen's letter regarding the Medicines Patent Pool

April 25, 2014 - Novartis' response to Public Citizen's letter regarding the Medicines Patent Pool

April 23, 2014 - Johnson & Johnson's response to Public Citizen's letter regarding the Medicines Patent Pool

April 8, 2014 - Public Citizen letters to AbbVie, Boehringer-Ingelheim, Bristol-Myers Squibb, F. Hoffman-La Roche, Gilead, GlaxoSmithKline, Johnson & Johnson, Merck & Co., Pfizer and Shionogi regarding the latest licensing agreement between ViiV Healthcare and the Medicines Patent Pool

April 1, 2014 - Medicines Patent Pool-ViiV Healthcare Licensing Agreement Statement of Peter Maybarduk, Global Access to Medicines Program Director

December 12, 2013 - Press Release: Medicines Patent Pool Reaches Licensing Deal with BMS to Expand Access to AIDS Drug

April 23, 2013 - Johnson & Johnson response to Public Citizen letter on the Medicines Patent Pool

April 22, 2013 - Bristol-Myers Squibb response to Public Citizen letter on the Medicines Patent Pool

April 2, 2013 - Public Citizen letters to Abbott Laboratories, Boehringer-Ingelheim, Bristol-Myers Squibb, GlaxoSmithKline, Johnson & Johnson, Merck & Co. and Pfizer regarding the ViiV Healthcare and Medicines Patent Pool Agreement

February 28, 2013 - Press Release: Medicines Patent Pool Reaches Licensing Deal for GSK Patents to Expand Access to Medicines for Children with HIV

December 22, 2011 - A brief history of Johnson & Johnson's refusal to negotiate with the Medicines Patent Pool

December 15, 2011 - Johnson & Johnson response to Public Citizen letter on the Medicines Patent Pool

December 10, 2011 - Public Citizen Brief on the Medicines Patent Pool

December 7, 2011 - Public Citizen letter to Tibotec/Johnson & Johnson urging them to negotiate licensing with the Medicines Patent Pool

Back to Access to Medicines Home Page

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