Haha, another April Fool's joke. This time it's on Timothy Geithner!

You may not believe this email string with Geithner . . .

Following publication of “Hourly Rates: A Modest Essay on Extraordinary Paychecks,” the following email string appeared on my computer. As such, it reads from the bottom up.

From: bnaylor@citizen.org

To: Timothy.Geithner@do.treas.gov

Sent: Thursday, March 31, 20118:52 PM

To: Timothy.Geithner@do.treas.gov

Subject: FW: A Modest Essay about Extraordinary Paychecks

I’d need to check with my superiors. Will relay tomorrow.  Many thanks, again.

From: Timothy.Geithner@do.treas.gov

Sent: Thursday, March 31, 20118:49 PM

To: bnaylor@citizen.org

Subject: FW: A Modest Essay about Extraordinary Paychecks

Any names, in particular?

From: bnaylor@citizen.org

Sent: Thursday, March 31, 20118:48 PM

To: Timothy.Geithner@do.treas.gov

Subject: FW: A Modest Essay about Extraordinary Paychecks

LOL. With a stroke of your pen, you can name a pro-reform, enlightened leader to head the OCC. Need I detail our concerns with the national bank supervisor? You can name the person “acting.” No need to get them past Shelby. (We have other ideas on how to do that.)

From: Timothy.Geithner@do.treas.gov

Sent: Thursday, March 31, 20118:35 PM

To: :bnaylor@citizen.org

Subject: FW: A Modest Essay about Extraordinary Paychecks

Right. Let’s say your report rubbed me the right way. Tell me something I can do-accomplish-tonight?

From: bnaylor@citizen.org

Sent: Thursday, March 31, 20118:30 PM

To: Timothy.Geithner@do.treas.gov

Subject: FW: A Modest Essay about Extraordinary Paychecks

Three wishes, as in a genie in the bottle?  Solve moral hazard. Dodd-Frank takes important steps, but our large banks are even larger than before the crash. You can declare large banks systemically risky and order a breakup. Reform executive compensation to remove the incentive for risk-taking.  Wage an immediate public battle to fund fully the agencies and appoint a strong leader of the new Office of Financial Research.

From: Timothy.Geithner@do.treas.gov

Sent: Thursday, March 31, 20118:24 PM

To: bnaylor@citizen.org

Subject: FW: A Modest Essay about Extraordinary Paychecks

No time. I’m in the mood. You have three wishes.

From: bnaylor@citizen.org

Sent: Thursday, March 31, 20118:18 PM

To: Timothy.Geithner@do.treas.gov

Subject: FW: A Modest Essay about Extraordinary Paychecks

Public Citizen promotes a robust agenda. Given your position, perhaps there is a time when a delegation from Public Citizen along with our coalition umbrelled as Americans for Financial Reform could meet.

From: Timothy.Geithner@do.treas.gov

Sent: Thursday, March 31, 20118:16 PM

To: bnaylor@citizen.org

Subject: FW: A Modest Essay about Extraordinary Paychecks

You can cut the honorifics. So what are your policy ideas?

From: bnaylor@citizen.org

Sent: Thursday, March 31, 20118:10 PM

To: Timothy.Geithner@do.treas.gov

Subject: FW: A Modest Essay about Extraordinary Paychecks

Mr. Secretary

I am flattered you took the time to read the report.  Public Citizen’s Congress Watch published this as a vehicle to help me reach out to leaders on the important subject as we navigate policy.

From: Timothy.Geithner@do.treas.gov.

Sent: Thursday, March 31, 20118:01 PM

To: bnaylor@citizen.org

Subject: FW: A Modest Essay about Extraordinary Paychecks

One of my aides forced me to read your report on high pay in the financial sector. I sense you don’t approve of a $5 billion annual salary. But you don’t actually say that. In fact,, you have no policy prescriptions at all.

Bartlett Naylor is financial policy advocate for Public Citizen, and former Chief of Investigations for the U.S. Senate Banking Committee.