Capitol Coin

Number of Cryptocurrency Lobbyists Nearly Tripled Since 2018 and Spending Quadrupled, With Help from Revolving Door Lobbyists and Corporate Allies

Cryptocurrency speculation mania has seized a subset of Americans and a small army of crypto lobbyists has descended on Congress. Among the crypto proponents pushing the industry’s interests in Washington, D.C., are scores of revolving door lobbyists and officials, including the former heads of multiple financial regulation agencies under former president Donald Trump. Recent disclosures offer an eye-opening look at this volatile industry’s rapidly escalating lobbying presence.

Key Findings

  • The number of lobbyists representing cryptocurrency proponents nearly tripled in just three years, jumping to 320 in 2021 from 115 in 2018. Lobbying spending attributable to the cryptocurrency sector quadrupled from $2.2 million in 2018 to $9 million in 2021.
  • The biggest lobbying spenders in the cryptocurrency sector were Coinbase, Ripple Labs, and Blockchain Association, each of which spent over $2 million on lobbying between 2018 and 2021.
  • Corporations and trade groups also reported lobbying on cryptocurrency issues, including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which reported 32 lobbyists on cryptocurrency issues and Meta Platforms (formerly Facebook), which reported 27, plus another four lobbying for Diem, Facebook’s now-defunct crypto effort.
  • Lobbyists for the crypto industry last year included former top officials from the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, Securities and Exchange Commission and the Treasury Department as well as former lawmakers including Sen. Blanche Lincoln (D-Ark.), Sen. Mark Pryor (D-Ark.), Rep. Sean Duffy (R-Wis.) and former high-ranking congressional staffers.
  • While not registered as lobbyists, over a dozen revolving door officials left government to serve cryptocurrency interests, including Trump White House acting chief of staff (and CFPB director) Mick Mulvaney; Trump SEC Chairman Jay Clayton; Trump OCC chief Brian Brooks; Trump CFTC chair Christopher Giancarlo; and Obama’s ambassador to China and former senator Max Baucus (D-Mont.).

Introduction

Cryptocurrencies and other blockchain-based digital financial technologies are having a popular culture moment. Several cryptocurrency businesses aired ads during the Super Bowl. The Los Angeles arena used by the NBA Lakers and Clippers, formerly Staples Center, was renamed Crypto.com Arena in a $700 million naming rights deal. A parade of celebrities has promoted investing in digital financial products. Several, including Kim Kardashian and Floyd Mayweather Jr., are being sued for allegedly pushing followers into crypto scams. Tesla CEO Elon Musk demonstrated the instability of crypto markets with several market-moving Twitter posts. One in six Americans say they’ve invested in, traded or used cryptocurrencies, and 43% of men between 18 and 29 have done so.

Also impossible to ignore is the sector’s whipsaw volatility: the crypto market peaked at $3 trillion in November 2021, then, three months later, plunged to about half of that. Federal agencies that for years mostly overlooked the sector as an anomalous novelty are beginning to recognize that, while cryptocurrencies’ utility as currency, investment or a store of value remains highly debatable, the use and misuse of digital assets can have real consequences. In 2020, law enforcement seized $3.5 billion in criminal crypto assets, while economists see some types of cryptocurrencies as potentially posing a threat to national financial stability.

Skeptical experts have spoken out in myriad outlets across the political spectrum, from the opinion pages of the Wall Street Journal (where a pair of John Hopkins University economists recently argued “Monetizing crypto would be tantamount to legalizing counterfeit currency”) to the leftist publication Jacobin (“Cryptocurrency Is a Giant Ponzi Scheme”). Additionally, the incredible resource demands of cryptocurrency “mining” – which requires enormous computing power in order to solve ultracomplex math problems – are raising serious pollution concerns. A recent Cambridge University study estimates cryptocurrency mining consumes as much energy as the entire nation of Argentina. Energy-intensive mining operations are firing up coal-burning power plants, posing serious real-world risks to air and water and stalling efforts to mitigate climate change.

While proponents often tout the benefits of cryptocurrency’s decentralized blockchain accounting methods – and point to the technology’s popularity among nonwhite and lower-income Americans – crypto ownership remains extremely concentrated, with 0.01% of all crypto holders controlling 27% of all crypto wealth.

Crypto evangelists have a reputation for celebrating the technology’s potential for “innovation” in hyperbolic terms. One financial analyst’s report speculating that “blockchain technology and the crypto economy could represent the biggest innovation of our lifetime” is typical. Nevertheless, the crypto industry is trying to get what it wants in Washington, D.C., the old-fashioned way: by aggressively spending real money on lobbying and political campaign contributions.

Methodology

Cryptocurrency lobbyists were identified in the Congressional Lobbying Disclosure database through a search of specific lobbying issues using terms such as “cryptocurrency” and “digital asset.” The lobbying clients were then researched to confirm whether they are broadly aligned with the cryptocurrency sector’s political interests (such as opposing cryptocurrency tax and reporting requirements and favoring light touch regulation of the sector). Generally, lobbying clients were identified as pro-crypto if they are businesses or representatives of businesses in the industry or advertise a pro-crypto orientation through public-facing communications. (Lobbying forms generally disclose that cryptocurrencies were a topic of lobby meetings, rather than a registrant’s position or orientation with regard to the topic.)

The Crypto Lobby: An Overview

Public Citizen identified 157 lobbyists and $9 million in lobbying spending by cryptocurrency proponents in 2021 – a threefold increase in lobbying spending over 2020 (see Table 1).

Table 1: Crypto lobbyist and spending tallies, 2018-2021

YearCrypto Lobbying SpendingCrypto Lobbyists
2018$2,230,000 47
2019$2,525,000 53
2020$2,809,000 56
2021$9,025,663 157

Source: Public Citizen analysis of federal lobbying disclosure database

As a sector, crypto’s lobbying presence is only just emerging. While it is dwarfed by the securities and investment sector, which spends more than $100 million annually and employed nearly 300 lobbyists in 2021, it is already surpassing the lobbying presence of payday lenders, which peaked at $7 million in 2010 and spent $4 million on 52 lobbyists in 2021.

Additionally, Public Citizen identified 163 lobbyists who reported lobbying on cryptocurrency issues in 2021 for businesses and lobbying groups that are aligned with cryptocurrency interests, up from 139 in 2020 – and from 68 in 2018 (see Table 2). Lobbying spending totals are not included for these groups because it is not possible to discern what fraction of these groups’ lobbying spending is on cryptocurrency issues.

Table 2: Tally of crypto ally lobbyists

YearCrypto Lobbyists
201868
2019122
2020139
2021163

Source: Public Citizen analysis of federal Lobbying Disclosure database

The disclosures reveal that the crypto lobby is made up of both crypto-focused businesses and groups whose lobbying is centered on crypto concerns as well as larger crypto-aligned lobbying allies, such as trade groups.

Taken together, the number of crypto lobbyists increased from 115 in 2018 to 320 in 2021 (see Chart 1).

Chart 1: Crypto lobbyist tallies, 2018-2021

This is an extraordinarily rapid increase in lobbying for an emergent sector – and also a characteristic response of an expanding industry drawing regulatory and legislative scrutiny.  Smaller crypto-centered groups reported a remarkable increase in their lobbying activity in 2021 (see Table 3):

Table 3: Crypto-focused businesses and groups that lobbied the most in 2021

Crypto Businesses and GroupsLobbying SpendingCount of Lobbyists
Coinbase, Inc.$1,525,000 26
Ripple Labs, Inc.$1,120,000 14
Blockchain Association$900,000 9
Stellar Development Foundation$590,000 5
Chamber of Digital Commerce$426,663 10
Coin Center$340,000 5
Coinflip$330,000 4
Atlas Power Holdings, LLC$320,000 10
Bitcoin Association$320,000 3
Digital Currency Group$290,000 8

Source: Public Citizen analysis of federal Lobbying Disclosure database

  • Leading the charge in this category was Coinbase, a cryptocurrency exchange company that in 2021 spent $1.5 million on 26 lobbyists from seven different lobbying firms plus its own in-house lobbyists. In 2020, Coinbase spent just $230,000 on seven lobbyists.
  • Ripple Labs, a financial technology company that, according to CEO Brad Garlinghouse, aspires to become “the Amazon of payments,” spent more than $1.1 million on 14 lobbyists from three separate lobbying firms – more than triple what it spent on the nine lobbyists it reported employing the previous year. Ripple and its executives have been fighting charges of selling unregistered securities the Securities & Exchange Commission filed in the final days of the Trump administration.
  • Stellar Development Foundation, a group that backs blockchain-based financial infrastructure development, increased its spending from $60,000 on two lobbyists in 2020 to $590,000 on five lobbyists in 2021.
  • The Chamber of Digital Commerce upped its lobbying presence from $120,000 for one lobbyist in 2020 to $426,663 for ten lobbyists in 2021.
  • Atlas Power Holdings, a private equity firm that revived an abandoned coal-fueled power plant in upstate New York in order to power a cryptocurrency mining operation, made its Capitol Hill debut in 2021. The company spent $320,000 on a team of ten Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck lobbyists who reported working on “Issues related to cryptocurrency.” The team included several former senior congressional officials, some of whom also lobbied for Crypto Council for Innovation, and former U.S. Senator Mark Pryor (D-Ark.).
  • Diem, Facebook’s failed crypto venture (which it sold off in early 2022) registered separately to lobby, spending $180,000 on four lobbyists, including former Rep. Sen Duffy (R-Wis.).
  • Other crypto lobbying groups that made lobbying disclosures for the first time were Solve.Care USA Inc., which spent $80,000 on 13 lobbyists, and Crypto Council for Innovation, which spent $150,000 on six lobbyists.
  • Collectively, these crypto-focused groups reported a jump in lobbying from spending $2.8 million on 56 lobbyists in 2020 to spending $9 million on 157 lobbyists in 2021.

Several big businesses and business groups that lobby on a broader range of issues also joined the crypto fray in 2021 (Table 4). The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the largest corporate lobbying organization in the U.S., leads the pack in terms of lobbyists who disclosed lobbying on crypto issues with a total of 32. The Chamber reported lobbying on crypto issues in almost every quarterly disclosure since 2018. The Chamber’s crypto policy lead left the organization in 2021 for Block, the  crypto-oriented payment processing company formerly known as Square.

Table 4: Crypto-allied businesses and groups that lobbied on crypto issues in 2021

Crypto Lobbyist ClientNumber of Crypto Lobbyists
U.S. Chamber of Commerce32
Meta Platforms, Inc. (formerly Facebook)27
National Venture Capital Association24
IBM16
Fidelity Investments13
Accenture11
Block Inc. (formerly Square Inc.)10
Visa Inc.8
PayPal Inc.6
Mastercard5
Citigroup5
Robinhood Markets Inc.5
Fiserv2
FreedomWorks1

Source: Public Citizen analysis of federal Lobbying Disclosure database

Among those that increased their crypto lobbying activities were:

  • Meta Platforms (formerly Facebook), which employed 27 crypto lobbyists in addition to those who lobbied for its Diem subsidiary.
  • Visa, which mentioned lobbying on cryptocurrency issues for the first time in 2021 in filings that reported spending on eight lobbyists. (Visa introduced a crypto advisory service in late 2021.)
  • IBM, which mentioned lobbying on cryptocurrency issues in 2021 on disclosures reporting 16 lobbyists – up from the 13 lobbyists in IBM’s 2020 disclosures mentioning cryptocurrency issues. (IBM licenses software for crypto security.)
  • Citigroup, which disclosed employing five lobbyists on cryptocurrency issues in the fourth quarter of 2021. (Citigroup recently launched a “digital assets group” to focus on cryptocurrency.)
  • Block (formerly known as Square), which mentioned cryptocurrency issues in only one filing in 2020 (representing one lobbyist out of the 17 it employed that year). In 2021, Block cited “crypto-education” or “crypto-tax” in three quarterly filings on ten of its lobbyists. (The company announced plans in early 2022 to start mining bitcoin.)
  • PayPal, which mentioned cryptocurrency issues in filings for two quarters of 2020 (which listed three lobbyists), cited cryptocurrency issues in all four quarterly filings in 2021 (which listed six lobbyists). (PayPal’s app lets users buy, sell, and hold)
  • Robinhood Markets, the online brokerage popular with many young investors, reported spending on five lobbyists in disclosures citing cryptocurrency issues in 2021. (Robinhood sells cryptocurrencies through its platform.)
  • Collectively, these big businesses and crypto allies reported a jump in lobbying from 139 lobbyists in 2020 to 163 lobbyists in 2021.

Revolving Door Crypto Lobbyists & Officials

The revolving door is one of the most pernicious influence-peddling tools used by corporations and wealthy special interests. Crypto proponents are taking full advantage of former officials who are cashing in on their connections. Public officials-turned-lobbyists have access to lawmakers and regulatory officials that is not available to the public, and they sell their access to the highest bidder among industries seeking influence.

Additionally, some public officials may be influenced in official actions by the implicit or explicit promise of a lucrative job in the private sector with interests seeking to shape public policy, or, more subtly, by the prospect of future employment. Occasionally these industry servants can revolve back into government, effectively “capturing” federal regulatory agencies by filling key government posts with the regulated industry’s preferred personnel.

In 2021, the crypto sector deployed scores of revolving door lobbyists to influence lawmakers and regulators. However, not all of the key personnel who revolved out of the government to serve cryptocurrency proponents did so as formally registered lobbyists. While not registered as lobbyists, many former senior federal officials have left government to serve the crypto sector. Among them are Trump White House acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney, Trump SEC Chair Jay Clayton, Trump OCC chief Brian Brooks, Obama’s ambassador to China and former senator Max Baucus (D-Mont.) and three former CFTC chairmen (including Trump CFTC chair Christopher Giancarlo, who in crypto circles is affectionately referred to as “CryptoDad”) (see Table 5).

Table 5: Notable crypto revolving door lobbyists and officials

Revolving Door OfficialFormer Federal Government TitleYear Leaving GovernmentRegistered LobbyistLatest Crypto Role
Blanche LincolnU.S. Senator (D-Ark.)2011YesBlockchain Association (lobbyist)
Brett RedfearnDirector, Division of Trading and Markets, SEC2021NoVP, Capital Markets at Coinbase (March-July 2021)
Brian BrooksActing Comptroller of the Currency (Treasury)2021NoCEO, Bitfury; Protego Trust board member
Christopher GiancarloChairman, CFTC2019NoBlockFi board member; Board of Advisors member, Chamber of Digital Commerce
Howard SchweitzerChief Operating Officer of TARP (the US Treasury's Troubled Asset Relief Program)2009YesBitcoin  Association (lobbyist)
James NewsomeChairman, CFTC2004NoBoard of Advisors member, Chamber of Digital Commerce
Jay ClaytonChairman, SEC2020NoFireBlocks advisory board member
Kevin MartinChairman, FCC2009YesMeta (formerly Facebook) (lobbyist)
Mark PryorU.S. Senator (D-Ark.)2013YesAtlas Power Holdings (lobbyist)
Mark WetjenActing Chair, CFTC2015NoMiami International Holding EVP; FTX US head of policy and regulatory strategy; Board of Advisors member, Chamber of Digital Commerce; Advisory board member, Coin Center; Advisory board member, BlockTower Capital
Marti ThomasAssistant Secretary, U.S. Treasury2001YesRipple Labs (lobbyist)
Max BaucusU.S. Senator (D-Mt.); Chair of Senate Finance Committee, Ambassador to China2017NoPolicy and Government Relations Advisor for Binance
Mick MulvaneyActing Chief of Staff, White House; Director, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau; Director, White House Office of Management and Budget2021NoBoard of Advisors member, Chamber of Digital Commerce
Paul AtkinsSEC Commissioner2008NoBoard of Advisors member, Chamber of Digital Commerce
Rick Dearborn​Deputy Chief of Staff, President Donald Trump2018YesStellar Development Foundation (lobbyist)
Sean DuffyU.S. Representative (R-Wis.)2019YesFacebook’s Diem (lobbyist)

Source: Public Citizen analysis of federal Lobbying Disclosure database and other public sources.

A prime example is the revolving door resume of Bitfury CEO Brian Brooks. Prior to joining the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, a major U.S. bank regulator, Brooks was the chief legal officer for cryptocurrency exchange platform Coinbase. Upon the departure of the Trump administration’s Comptroller, Joseph Otting, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin picked Brooks to head the office as Acting Comptroller. Brooks held the post for nine months, enacting several crypto-friendly measures. Brooks left the government after Trump lost the election, then became the CEO of Binance.US, another cryptocurrency exchange, then changed jobs a few months later to become CEO of Bitfury, a cryptocurrency mining company. Brooks recently joined the board of another crypto firm, Protego Trust.

In December, Bitfury CEO Brooks joined fellow crypto executives in testifying before Congress, urging the adoption of what Reuters characterized as “light touch” regulation. Following the hearing, top Republican on the House Financial Services Committee and longtime opponent of financial regulations Rep. Patrick McHenry (N.C.) sent a letter to committee Chairwoman Maxine Waters (D-Calif.) urging the prioritization of legislation to get ahead of regulators and suggesting the committee should question whether “federal regulation of cryptocurrency trading platforms is necessary or appropriate.” McHenry’s former chief of staff is among the revolving door cryptocurrency lobbyists, having lobbied in 2021 as CEO for Atlas Crossing for the Global Digital Asset & Cryptocurrency Association (see Table 6).

Brooks is just one of the Trump administration financial regulatory agency heads who revolved into working for crypto proponents after leaving government. Trump’s chair of the Commodities Futures Trading Commission, Christopher Giancarlo, and Trump’s Securities and Exchange Commission chair, Jay Clayton, followed a similar path. After departing government service, Clayton joined the advisory board of Fireblocks, a cryptocurrency trading platform, while Giancarlo did a four-month stint on the board of BlockFi and became a member of the Chamber of Digital Commerce’s board of advisors. Clayton’s SEC chief of staff Lucas Moskowitz also spun through the revolving door to lobby for the crypto sector. Moskowitz became the deputy general counsel for trading app Robinhood and lobbied on crypto for the company in 2021. Hermine Wong, another veteran of Clayton’s SEC, lobbied for Coinbase as the company’s head of policy. A former staffer for SEC Commissioner Hester “CryptoMom” Peirce launched an avowedly pro-crypto lobbyshop and lobbied for DeFi Angels (and also posts on Twitter using the handle “Crypto Lobbyist”).

Mick Mulvaney held several Trump administration leadership roles, including serving as acting White House chief of staff and, prior to that, directing the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Mulvaney undermined the agency from within after vehemently opposing it as a member of Congress. Mulvaney joined the Chamber of Digital Commerce’s board of advisors in 2020. Another former member of Trump’s White House, deputy chief of staff Rick Dearborn, also lobbied for crypto interests in 2021.

While cryptocurrency boosterism has noticeably gained traction among Republican officials, it would be a mistake to characterize the phenomenon as occurring exclusively on the political right. Plenty of Democratic officials have spun through the revolving door to leverage their work in government on behalf of the public to advance their careers in service to corporate interests.

In addition to the two former Democratic senators from Arkansas, Blanche Lincoln and Mark Pryor, who lobbied on behalf of crypto proponents, former Democratic senator from Montana (and Obama’s ambassador to China) Max Baucus has represented crypto interests but is not a registered lobbyist for the industry. As senator, Baucus served for seven years as chair of the powerful Senate Finance Committee. In 2021, Baucus became a policy and government relations advisor for Binance, the world’s largest cryptocurrency exchange platform, which is under investigation by the SEC, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Democratic CFTC Commissioner (and a former temporary acting CFTC chair) Mark Wetjen, who served as a top aid to the late former Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.), has amassed a long list of crypto roles. Wetjen is executive vice president of Miami International Holding, where, according to press statements, he will “play a pivotal role in projects … including digital securities and crypto assets and derivatives.” Additionally, Wetjen is head of policy and regulatory strategy for FTX US, a cryptocurrency exchange company, and a member of advisory boards for the Chamber of Digital Commerce, Coin Center and BlockTower Capital.

Also among Democratic crypto allies are former congressional staffers who are poised to be particularly influential in the context of the Democratic House and Senate majorities. Staffers formerly employed by Chairman Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.), House Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.), Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.), and Sen. Bob Menendez (D-N.J.) are all among the 2021 revolving door crypto lobbyists (see Table 6).

Table 6: Notable former congressional staffers among crypto revolving door lobbyists

Revolving Door LobbyistCongressional TitleYear Leaving GovernmentCrypto Lobbying Client
Andrew EckStaff Director of the Subcommittee on Terrorism and Illicit Finance on the House Financial Services Committee and Senior Policy Advisor to Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-Texas)2019Chainalysis Inc.
Cachavious EnglishChief of staff for Rep. Terri Sewell (D-Ala.)2020Facebook’s Diem
Chris RandleLegislative Director for Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-N.Y.), chairman of the Democratic Caucus2018Meta (formerly Facebook)
Christopher WilcoxLegislative Director and Counsel to Rep. Val Demings (D-Fla.)2018Ripple Labs
Courtney TempleLegislative director for Sen. Thom Tillis (R-N.C.)2020Meta (formerly Facebook)
Denzel SingletaryLegislative Aide/ Assistant for Sen. Gillibrand (D-N.Y.)2017Robinhood Markets
Francis (Olamide) WilliamsSubcommittee Director for the U.S. House Committee on Financial Services2020Block (formerly Square)
George CallasSenior Tax Counsel to Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), Speaker of the House2018Blockchain Association
Izzy KleinDeputy Staff Director, Joint Economic Committee, Chairman Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.)2009Digital Currency Group
Joseph CortinaSpecial Assistant for House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.)2018Coin Center
Kate LynchLegislative Assistant, Reps. John Larson (D-Conn.), chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, and Niki Tsongas (D-Mass.)2012Digital Currency Group
Kevin EdgarChief counsel of the House Financial Services Committee2019Meta (formerly Facebook)
Lila Nieves-LeeStaff Director – Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.)2020Visa
Matthew JohnsonChief Counsel, Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas); Senate Judiciary Committee2013Digital Currency Group
Michael GaffinLegislative director for Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), chairman of the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee2014Mastercard
Mike AhernBanking Legislative Assistant for U.S. Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.)2016Coin Center
Nadeam ElshamiChief of Staff for House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.)2017Atlas Power Holdings
Philip SwartzfagerLegislative Director for Rep. Bruce Polquin (R-Maine)2019PayPal
Ritika RobertsonChief of staff for Rep. Ken Buck (R-Colo.)2020Meta (formerly Facebook)
Ron HammondFinancial Services Policy Lead for Rep. Warren Davidson (R-Ohio)2019Blockchain Association
Sandra LuffLegislative Director for Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.)2017Meta (formerly Facebook)
Sean JoyceChief of Staff for Rep. Patrick McHenry (R-N.C.)2017Global Digital Asset & Cryptocurrency Association
Sydney PaulSenior legislative counsel for Sen. Gary Peters (D-Mich.), chair of the Homeland Security & Government Affairs Committee2019Meta (formerly Facebook)
Trevor KolegoDirector of member services for Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio)2015Mastercard
Zach Howell​Chief of Staff for Rep. John Katko (R-N.Y.)2020Global Digital Asset & Cryptocurrency Association

Conclusion

Despite the recent plunge in cryptocurrency values, the cryptocurrency lobbying spree is only just beginning. Lawmakers are preparing to introduce cryptocurrency legislation, and cryptocurrency advocates are preparing to back crypto-enthusiast candidates.

Like the megabanks, tech companies, fossil fuel corporations, and other industries, the crypto sector is putting millions and millions of dollars into pushing lawmakers to put their private business interests before the public interest. In Washington, D.C., where money speaks loudly, the digital currency lobby is determined to have a say. In the face of this lobbying spree, even the most crypto-friendly lawmakers should pause to ask whether what is good for this volatile sector is what’s best for their constituents.

Appendix of Revolving Door Crypto Officials and Lobbyists

NameGovernment TitlePart of the GovernmentYear Leaving GovernmentLobbyistCrypto Employment / Service
Christopher GiancarloChairman, CFTCCommodity Futures Trading Commission2019NoBlockFi board member; Board of Advisors member, Chamber of Digital Commerce
James NewsomeChairman, CFTCCommodity Futures Trading Commission2004NoBoard of Advisors member, Chamber of Digital Commerce
Mark WetjenActing Chair / Commissioner, CFTCCommodity Futures Trading Commission2015NoMiami International Holding EVP; FTX US head of policy and regulatory strategy; Board of Advisors member, Chamber of Digital Commerce; Advisory board member, Coin Center; Advisory board member, BlockTower Capital
Andrew EckStaff Director of the Subcommittee on Terrorism and Illicit Finance on the House Financial Services Committee and Senior Policy Advisor to Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-Texas)Congress2019YesChainalysis Inc. (lobbyist)
Blanche LincolnU.S. Senator (D-Ark.)Congress2011YesBlockchain Association (lobbyist)
Cachavious EnglishChief of staff for Rep. Terri Sewell (D-Ala.)Congress2020YesFacebook’s Diem (lobbyist)
Chris RandleLegislative Director for Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-N.Y.), chairman of the Democratic CaucusCongress2018YesMeta (formerly Facebook) (lobbyist)
Christopher WilcoxLegislative Director and Counsel to Rep. Val Demings (D-Fla.)Congress2018YesRipple Labs (lobbyist)
Courtney TempleLegislative director for Sen. Thom Tillis (R-N.C.)Congress2020YesMeta (formerly Facebook) (lobbyist)
Denzel SingletaryLegislative Aide/ Assistant for Sen. Gillibrand (D-N.Y.)Congress2017YesRobinhood Markets (lobbyist)
Francis (Olamide) WilliamsSubcommittee Director for the U.S. House Committee on Financial ServicesCongress2020YesBloc k (formerly Square) (lobbyist)
George CallasSenior Tax Counsel to Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), Speaker of the HouseCongress2018YesBlockchain Association (lobbyist)
Joseph CortinaSpecial Assistant for House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.)Congress2018YesCoin Center (lobbyist)
Kevin EdgarChief counsel of the House Financial Services CommitteeCongress2019YesMeta (formerly Facebook) (lobbyist)
Lila Nieves-LeeStaff Director – Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.)Congress2020YesVisa (lobbyist)
Mark PryorU.S. Senator (D-Ark.)Congress2013YesAtlas Power Holdings (lobbyist)
Max BaucusChair of Senate Finance Committee, AmbassadorCongress2017NoPolicy and Government Relations Advisor for Binance
Michael GaffinLegislative director for Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), chairman of the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs CommitteeCongress2014YesMastercard (lobbyist)
Mike AhernBanking Legislative Assistant for U.S. Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.)Congress2016YesCoin Center (lobbyist)
Nadeam ElshamiChief of Staff for House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.)Congress2017YesAtlas Power Holdings (lobbyist)
Philip SwartzfagerLegislative Director for Rep. Bruce Polquin (R-Maine)Congress2019YesPayPal (lobbyist)
Ritika RobertsonChief of staff for Rep. Ken Buck (R-Colo.)Congress2020YesMeta (formerly Facebook) (lobbyist)
Ron HammondFinancial Services Policy Lead for Rep. Warren Davidson (R-Ohio)Congress2019YesBlockchain Association (lobbyist)
Sandra LuffLegislative Director for Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.)Congress2017YesMeta (formerly Facebook) (lobbyist)
Sean DuffyU.S. Representative (R-Wis.)Congress2019YesFacebook’s Diem (lobbyist)
Sean JoyceChief of Staff for Rep. Patrick McHenry (R-N.C.)Congress2017YesGlobal Digital Asset & Cryptocurrency Association (lobbyist)
Sydney PaulSenior legislative counsel for Sen. Gary Peters (D-Mich.), chair of the Homeland Security & Government Affairs CommitteeCongress2019YesMeta (formerly Facebook) (lobbyist)
Trevor KolegoDirector of member services for Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio)Congress2015YesMastercard (lobbyist)
Zach Howell​Chief of Staff for Rep. John Katko (R-N.Y.)Congress2020YesGlobal Digital Asset & Cryptocurrency Association (lobbyist)
Alan CohnAssistant Secretary for Strategy, Planning, Analysis & Risk, Department of Homeland SecurityDepartment of Homeland Security2015NoCo-chair of lobbying firm Steptoe & Johnson’s  Blockchain and Cryptocurrency practice; Principal, ADC / Strategy.works
Gus ColdebellaActing General Counsel, Department of Homeland SecurityDepartment of Homeland Security2009NoTrue Ventures partner focused on cryptocurrency
Kevin MartinChairman of the FCCFederal Communications Commission2009YesMeta (formerly Facebook) (lobbyist)
Sarah Dumont-MerchakDirector for legislative affairs, Federal Housing Finance AdministrationFederal Housing Finance Administration2021YesMastercard (lobbyist)
Jason WeinsteinDeputy Assistant Attorney General, Criminal Division, DOJJustice Department2012NoCo-chair of Steptoe's Blockchain and Cryptocurrency practice; Board of Advisors member, Chamber of Digital Commerce; advisory board member, Coin Center
Annemarie TierneySenior Counsel - Division of Corporation Finance, SECSecurities & Exchange Commission1996NoPrincipal, Liquid Advisors Inc.; Senior Strategic Advisor, Chamber of Digital Commerce
Brett RedfearnDirector, Division of Trading and Markets, SECSecurities & Exchange Commission2021NoVP, Capital Markets at Coinbase (March-July 2021)
Hermine WongSpecial Counsel, SECSecurities & Exchange Commission2020YesCoinbase (lobbyist)
Jay ClaytonChairman, SECSecurities & Exchange Commission2020NoFireBlocks advisory board member
Joshua DeeseStaff member for ​SEC Commissioner Hester PeirceSecurities & Exchange Commission2021YesDefi Angels LLC (lobbyist)
Lucas MoskowitzChief of Staff for SEC Commission Chair Jay ClaytonSecurities & Exchange Commission2019YesRobinhood Markets (lobbyist)
Paul AtkinsSEC CommissionerSecurities & Exchange Commission2008NoBoard of Advisors member, Chamber of Digital Commerce
Brian BrooksActing Comptroller of the CurrencyTreasury Department2021NoCEO, Bitfury
Brian McGuireAssistant Secretary for Legislative Affairs (Treasury)Treasury Department2020YesCrypto Council for Innovation (lobbyist)
Howard SchweitzerChief Operating Officer of TARP (the US Treasury's Troubled Asset Relief Program)Treasury Department2009YesBitcoin  Association (lobbyist)
Marti ThomasAssistant Secretary, U.S. TreasuryTreasury Department2001YesRipple Labs (lobbyist)
Michael DiRomaDeputy Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Legislative AffairsTreasury Department2020YesChainalysis Inc. (lobbyist)
Robert M. BaldwinSpecial Advisor to Deputy Secretary Justin Muzinich, US TreasuryTreasury Department2021NoAssociation for Digital Asset Markets (ADAM) head of policy
Rosa “Rosie” Gumataotao RiosTreasurer of the USTreasury Department2016NoRipple board member
Stuart LeveyUnder Secretary for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence, US TreasuryTreasury Department2011NoLibra CEO / CEO of Diem Association
Alexander AngelsonSpecial Assistant to President Donald J. TrumpWhite House2020YesRipple Labs (lobbyist)
Anjelica DortchSenior Technology Advisor in the White House Office of Management & BudgetWhite House2019YesIBM (lobbyist)
Faryar ShirzadDeputy National Security Advisor for International Economic Affairs, National Security Council (White House)White House2006YesCoinbase (lobbyist)
Katie DonnellDirector, International Economic Policy for the National Security Council (White House)White House2021YesIBM (lobbyist)
Mick MulvaneyActing Chief of Staff, White HouseWhite House2021NoBoard of Advisors member, Chamber of Digital Commerce
Nkechi IhemeWhite House Senior Policy Advisor (technology)White House2016YesMeta (formerly Facebook) (lobbyist)
Rick Dearborn​Deputy Chief of Staff, President Donald TrumpWhite House2018YesStellar Development Foundation (lobbyist)
Scott MasonCongressional Relations for Trump AdministrationWhite House2017YesBlock.One (lobbyist)