What's New


July 21, 2016 - CitizenVox: An Important Remedy for Pharma's Exorbitant Pricing

July 20, 2016 - Letter from 56 Non-profit Organizations and Academic Experts to Secretary Kerry Regarding State Department Pressure Against Access to Medicines Efforts

July 20, 2016 - Public Health, Human Rights and Faith Organizations Question State Department Pressure Against Global Access to Medicines Initiatives

July 15, 2016 - Huffington Post: Taxpayers Funded A Lifesaving Drug And Guess What Happened Next (authored by Sen. Bernie Sanders)

July 13, 2016 - CitizenVox: Pharma (contribution) Addicts in Congress

July 8, 2016 - Public Citizen letter in U.S. News and World Report: An Overdue Fix for Medicare

For older news, visit the Access to Medicines news archive

U.S. Pressure Against Countries' Public Interest Policies


Global Access to Medicines Program Director Peter Maybarduk delivers testimony at USTR's 2014 Special 301 hearing.

Public Citizen Statement on the 2014 Special 301 Report


April 30, 2014

U.S. Chamber, Big Pharma Miss Their Target on India Trade, But U.S. Watch List Still Bullies India, Other Developing Countries Over Health Policies

Statement of Peter Maybarduk, Director, Public Citizen Global Access to Medicines Program

Note: Today, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) released its annual Special 301 Report. The 301 Report places countries on a watch list for practices the U.S. government believes reflect “inadequate” intellectual property (IP) protection, even when these policies safeguard important public interests including health.

The Special 301 Report's watch list is a morally repugnant and unnecessary U.S. government practice, which annually bullies countries for implementing polices that promote access to lifesaving medicines despite serious questions about the legality of such unilateral threats under international law. The 301 watch list should be discontinued in its entirety. Continue reading...

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