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Eyes on Trade

Public Citizen's Global Trade Watch blog on globalization and trade

 

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Congressional Trade Voting Records

Congressional Trade Voting Records


 

Welcome to GTW's Congressional Vote Chart. The votes included here were among GTW's top legislative priorities and reflect the concerns of a broad-based citizens' movement fighting for government and corporate accountability. The votes offer a useful gauge of a Senator or Representative's commitment to fair trade and the public interest.

Who represents you? Find your Senators and Representative!

Final House and Senate Vote Totals for Major Trade Votes
Listed Chronologically

 1993 Fast Track  House  Senate
 NAFTA  House  Senate
 WTO  House  Senate
 1998 Fast Track  House  N/A
 AGOA - On Passage  House  Senate
 - On Conference Report  House  Senate
 China PNTR  House  Senate
 2000 WTO Withdrawal  House  N/A 
 Jordan FTA  House*  Senate* 
 2001-'02 Fast Track - On Passage  House  Senate
 - On Conference Report  House  Senate
 Chile FTA  House  Senate
 Singapore FTA  House  Senate
 Australia FTA  House  Senate
 Morocco FTA  House  Senate
 2005 WTO Withdrawal  House  N/A 
 CAFTA  House  Senate
 Bahrain FTA  House  Senate** 
 Oman FTA  House  Senate
 Peru FTA  House  Senate
 Panama FTA  House  Senate
 Colombia FTA  House  Senate
 Korea FTA  House  Senate

*Passed by Voice Vote
**Passed by Unanimous Consent

To see trade votes since 1991 by current members of Congress, click here: http://www.citizen.org/documents/trade2011.xls

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