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June 3, 2014

More Than 50 Organizations Urge Senate to Back Constitutional Amendment to Curb Campaign Spending

Letter Signed by Good Government, Environmental, Labor, Economic, Civil Justice and Faith Groups

WASHINGTON, D.C. – More than 50 groups representing an array of interests today called for the U.S. Senate to back a constitutional amendment that would help rein in out-of-control campaign spending.

In a letter sent to lawmakers, the groups urged support for S.J. Res. 19, a constitutional amendment to establish that Congress and the states have the power to regulate and limit election spending.

“We know that America will never deliver on its promise if our election system is dominated by big money interests,” they wrote.

Good government, food safety, economic justice and faith groups signed. The list ranges from Public Citizen, USAction and Common Cause to Sierra Club, Greenpeace, National Education Association, NAACP, Franciscan Action Network, Pesticide Action Network, and Communications Workers of America. Ben & Jerry’s Homemade, Inc. signed too.

S.J. Res. 19 would overturn Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission (FEC), as well as McCutcheon v. FEC, the decision issued in April that eliminated the cap on the total amount an individual can contribution to candidates, political parties and political committees. The amendment also would overturn the 1976 Buckley v. Valeo ruling, which established the doctrine colloquially known as “money equals speech.”

The letter said: “America faces great and serious challenges – putting people back to work, addressing deepening inequality, averting catastrophic climate change, fixing our schools, ensuring quality and affordable health care for all, and much more. Our country has the wealth and wherewithal, and the creativity and conscience, to meet these challenges. But we will fall short unless we repair our democracy.

“We do not lightly call for amending our great Constitution. But we know that there can be no greater constitutional purpose than ensuring the functioning of our democracy. We urge you in the strongest terms to support S.J. Res. 19, so that it quickly becomes the 28th Amendment to our Constitution.”

View the complete letter and the list of signers.

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