Bookmark and Share

 


Learn more about our policy experts.

Media Contacts

Angela Bradbery, Director of Communications
(202) 588-7741
abradbery@citizen.org, Twitter

Barbara Holzer, Broadcast Manager
(202) 588-7716
bholzer@citizen.org

Dorry Samuels, Press Office Coordinator
(202) 588-7742
dsamuels@citizen.org, Twitter


Other Important links

Press Release Database
Citizen Vox blog
Texas Vox blog
Consumer Law and Policy blog
Citizen Energy blog
Eyes on Trade blog
Myspace/publiccitizen
Facebook/publiccitizen


Follow us on Twitter


Twitter Updates

    Dec. 21 - New report links actions by Sen. Phil Gramm, wife Wendy Gramm and Bush officials to Enron fiasco, California crisis

     

    After Enron Corp. used its vast web of political connections to win December 2000 passage of commodities trading legislation that helped the company shield its energy trading activities from government scrutiny, California’s energy crisis suddenly took a dramatic turn for the worse as artificial supply shortages led to frequent rolling blackouts, according to a new Public Citizen report released Friday.

     

    The legislation reducing government oversight of energy trading was muscled through Congress - without a Senate committee hearing with the aid of U.S. Sen. Phil Gramm of Texas. Gramm was chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, which had jurisdiction over the legislation he co-sponsored, but he chose to bypass his committee, and the bill was quietly tacked onto a "must-pass" appropriations bill late in the session. Gramm s wife, Wendy Gramm, also aided Enron s rise to power. As chairwoman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, she pushed through a key regulatory exemption on Jan. 14, 1993, just as she was about to leave office. Five weeks later, she joined Enron s board of directors, where she served on the board s audit committee and had access to key financial information about the company.

    To read the entire press release, click here.

    To read the report, Blind Faith: How Deregulation and Enron's Influence Over Government Looted Billions from Americans, click here.

    Copyright © 2014 Public Citizen. Some rights reserved. Non-commercial use of text and images in which Public Citizen holds the copyright is permitted, with attribution, under the terms and conditions of a Creative Commons License. This Web site is shared by Public Citizen Inc. and Public Citizen Foundation. Learn More about the distinction between these two components of Public Citizen.


    Public Citizen, Inc. and Public Citizen Foundation

     

    Together, two separate corporate entities called Public Citizen, Inc. and Public Citizen Foundation, Inc., form Public Citizen. Both entities are part of the same overall organization, and this Web site refers to the two organizations collectively as Public Citizen.

    Although the work of the two components overlaps, some activities are done by one component and not the other. The primary distinction is with respect to lobbying activity. Public Citizen, Inc., an IRS § 501(c)(4) entity, lobbies Congress to advance Public Citizen’s mission of protecting public health and safety, advancing government transparency, and urging corporate accountability. Public Citizen Foundation, however, is an IRS § 501(c)(3) organization. Accordingly, its ability to engage in lobbying is limited by federal law, but it may receive donations that are tax-deductible by the contributor. Public Citizen Inc. does most of the lobbying activity discussed on the Public Citizen Web site. Public Citizen Foundation performs most of the litigation and education activities discussed on the Web site.

    You may make a contribution to Public Citizen, Inc., Public Citizen Foundation, or both. Contributions to both organizations are used to support our public interest work. However, each Public Citizen component will use only the funds contributed directly to it to carry out the activities it conducts as part of Public Citizen’s mission. Only gifts to the Foundation are tax-deductible. Individuals who want to join Public Citizen should make a contribution to Public Citizen, Inc., which will not be tax deductible.

     

    To become a member of Public Citizen, click here.
    To become a member and make an additional tax-deductible donation to Public Citizen Foundation, click here.