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Enron CEO Ken Lay's Correspondence with Treasury Secretaries

Enron CEO Ken Lay's Correspondence with Treasury Secretaries


The following letters illustrate Ken Lay’s close relationship with a variety of Treasury secretaries during the Clinton and Bush administrations. In one letter, newly appointed Secretary Lawrence Summers assures Lay, "I’ll keep my eye on power deregulation and energy market infrastructure issues."

Job Offer from Ken Lay to former Secretary Bob Rubin: Ken Lay offers former Treasury Secretary Bob Rubin a job on Enron's board of directors.

Congratulations letter from Ken Lay to new Secretary Lawrence Summers: Ken Lay congratulates newly appointed Treasury Secretary Larry Summers.

Thank-you note from Larry Summers to Ken Lay: Newly appointed Secretary Summers thanks Lay for his congratulations, and writes, "I'll keep my eye on power deregulation and energy market infrastructure issues."

10/99 Letter from Ken Lay to Larry Summers: Ken Lay writes to Treasury Secretary Larry Summers objecting to regulation of OTC derivatives.

11/99 Letter from Larry Summers to Ken Lay: Larry Summers responds to Lay's objections to the regulation of OTC derivatives, assuring him that derivative deals will not be regulated (despite the Working Group's recommendations otherwise).

Congratulations letter from Ken Lay to new Secretary O'Neill: Ken Lay congratulates newly appointed Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill.

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