News Articles

TPP and copyright in the media

November 7, 2013-EFF: How Can the New York Times Endorse an Agreement the Public Can't Read?

October 28, 2013-
The Japan Times: TPP talks bog down over intellectual property rights

October 28, 2013-
The Japan Times: Copyright extension opponents ready for new fight

October 25, 2013-
The Raw Story: Ed Schultz asks Democrats and Tea Partiers: Unite against "NAFTA on steroids" (links to rawstory.com)

October 24, 2013-
Global Post: ADB voices concern over TPP agenda

October 23, 2013-
EFF: Public Interest Coalition Opposes Fast-Track Authority for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (links to eff.org)

October 23, 2013-
Law 360: Advocacy Groups Oppose Fast-Track Trade Power (links to law360.com)

October 23, 2013-
Global Post: TPP countries to meet over intellectual property in Tokyo

October 13, 2013-
Center for the Study of Innovative Freedom: Longer copyright terms, stiffer copyright penalties coming, thanks to TPP and ACTA

October 4, 2013-
rabble.ca: TPP: A fast track to Internet censorship? (links to rabble.ca)

August 8, 2013-
Cato Institute: Copyright Terms in the TPP: Too Long, or Way Too Long?

Jul 26, 2013 -
Defending a Free and Open Internet (links to huffingtonpost.ca)

July 24, 2013 -
A Fair Deal: Diverse International coalition launches alternative process to secretive Trans-Pacific Partnership talks (links to ourfairdeal.org)

June 17, 2013-
Maclean's: Trade Agreements, Privacy, and the Cloud (links to macleans.ca)

June 14, 2013
- Open Media: Fair Deal Coalition gains momentum, as thousands speak out against TPP copyright rules (links to openmedia.org)

May 17, 2013- Computer World: Digital coalition asks for a fair deal on TPP copyright provisions (links to computerworld.com.au)



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