Access to Justice

A strong, democratic civil justice system is critical to safeguarding individual rights and promoting public health and safety. Public Citizen fights for the public interest in the courts, works to defend them, and makes them more accessible to ordinary people.

What's New

Oct. 13, 2014 - Blog Post: Big banks have a license to steal
July 31, 2014 - Press Release: Public Citizen Commends Obama for Executive Order
July 30, 2014 - Blog Post: White House Moves Against Forced Arbitration
May 21, 2014 - Press Release: House Republicans Continue Attempts to Cripple Consumer Protection Agency


Recent Reports

May 1, 2014 - Cases That Would Have Been
February 27, 2014 - Righting a Financial Wrong
Sept. 20, 2013 - Private Actions, Public Benefits
Aug. 6, 2013 - No Correlation
More - See More Access to Justice Reports


Sign Up

to receive regular updates on our campaigns for access to justice and consumer protection.

Explore Public Citizen's Access to Justice Program

Fair Arbitration Now

Cases That Would Have Been 

Congress should enact the Arbitration Fairness Act now to protect the rights of employees and consumers. Take action.
 

This report identifies 140 cases, affecting thousands of consumers, who were barred from participating in class actions due to a forced arbitration clause. Read the report.

   

Forced Arbitration and Finance

Public Interest Law

After it completes a study on the use of pre-dispute forced arbitration, the CFPB has the authority to eliminate the use of arbitration clauses in consumer financial contracts. Learn more.  
Public Citizen Litigation Group, founded in 1972, litigates public interest cases at all levels of the federal and state judiciaries. Learn more about our work.
   

Follow Us on Twitter


Please wait while my tweets load

If you can't wait - click here

Copyright © 2014 Public Citizen. Some rights reserved. Non-commercial use of text and images in which Public Citizen holds the copyright is permitted, with attribution, under the terms and conditions of a Creative Commons License. This Web site is shared by Public Citizen Inc. and Public Citizen Foundation. Learn More about the distinction between these two components of Public Citizen.


Public Citizen, Inc. and Public Citizen Foundation

 

Together, two separate corporate entities called Public Citizen, Inc. and Public Citizen Foundation, Inc., form Public Citizen. Both entities are part of the same overall organization, and this Web site refers to the two organizations collectively as Public Citizen.

Although the work of the two components overlaps, some activities are done by one component and not the other. The primary distinction is with respect to lobbying activity. Public Citizen, Inc., an IRS § 501(c)(4) entity, lobbies Congress to advance Public Citizen’s mission of protecting public health and safety, advancing government transparency, and urging corporate accountability. Public Citizen Foundation, however, is an IRS § 501(c)(3) organization. Accordingly, its ability to engage in lobbying is limited by federal law, but it may receive donations that are tax-deductible by the contributor. Public Citizen Inc. does most of the lobbying activity discussed on the Public Citizen Web site. Public Citizen Foundation performs most of the litigation and education activities discussed on the Web site.

You may make a contribution to Public Citizen, Inc., Public Citizen Foundation, or both. Contributions to both organizations are used to support our public interest work. However, each Public Citizen component will use only the funds contributed directly to it to carry out the activities it conducts as part of Public Citizen’s mission. Only gifts to the Foundation are tax-deductible. Individuals who want to join Public Citizen should make a contribution to Public Citizen, Inc., which will not be tax deductible.

 

To become a member of Public Citizen, click here.
To become a member and make an additional tax-deductible donation to Public Citizen Foundation, click here.