Government Reform

The government should serve voters, not corporate special interests. Public Citizen works to empower ordinary citizens, reduce the influence of big corporations on government, open the government to public scrutiny, and hold public officials accountable for their misdeeds.

The IRS should create bright line definitions for "political activity"


The Bright Lines Project offers bipartisan solutions to clarify acceptable activity by nonprofits

Explore Public Citizen's Government Reform Program

McCutcheon v. FEC

Tell the SEC: Force Disclosure


 McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission  could have profound implications for our democracy. Learn more about McCutcheon v. FEC.
 
The SEC is considering the public's request to require publicly traded companies to disclose political contributions. Tell the agency to finalize a rule this year. Take action. 
   

Rising Tide

Big Spenders, Local Elections


This report finds that outside groups are exerting outsized influence on elections in states  that had campaign finance laws invalidated by the Citizens United ruling. Read the report.
  In this report, Public Citizen outlines several, relatively obscure, local elections that the 501(c)(4) group Americans for Prosperity sought to influence with outside spending. Read the report.
   

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