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1996 EFOIA Amendments: Legislative History

I. TITLE


Short Title
Electronic Freedom of Information Amendments of 1996
Official Title As Introduced:
"A bill to amend section 552 of title 5, United States Code, popularly known as the Freedom of Information Act, to provide for public access to information in an electronic format, and for other purposes."


II. SPONSORS


Primary Sponsor: Rep Tate, (introduced 07/12/96)

3 Cosponsors:
Rep Horn - 07/12/96
Rep Maloney - 07/12/96
Rep Peterson, C. - 07/12/96

III. COMMITTEE REPORTS


IV. CHRONOLOGY OF CONGRESSIONAL CONSIDERATION


House Action(s)

  • July 12, 1996:

H.R. 3802 referred to the House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight.

Introductory remarks on Measure. Cong. Rec. E1280-1281

  • July 15, 1996:

Referred to the Subcommittee on Government Management, Information and Technology.

  • July 16, 1996:

Subcommittee Consideration and Mark-up Session Held.
Forwarded by Subcommittee to Full Committee by Voice Vote. July 25, 1996: Committee Consideration and Mark-up Session Held.
July 25, 1996:
Ordered to be Reported (Amended) by Voice Vote.

  • Sep 17, 1996:


Reported to House (Amended) by House Committee on
Government Reform. H. Rept. 104-795. Cong. Rec. H10523

  • Sep 17, 1996:

Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 433. Called up by House under suspension of the rules.Cong. Rec. H10447
Considered by House as unfinished business.Cong. Rec. H10447-10452, H10493-10494
Passed House (Amended) by Yea-Nay Vote: 402 - 0 (Roll no. 414).
Cong. Rec. H10494

Full text of Measure as passed House printed. Cong. Rec. H10447-10449

  • Sept. 20, 1996:

Enrolled Measure signed in House. Cong. Rec. H10762

Senate Action(s)

  • Sept. 17, 1996

Senate floor discussion of S. 1090, Electronic Freedom of Information Improvement Act of 1996, which contains provisions similar to those later enacted in EFOIA Amendments, Cong. Rec. S10713-S10717

  • Sept. 18, 1996:

H.R. 3802 is received in the Senate, read twice, considered, read the third time, and passed without amendment by Unanimous Consent. Cong. Rec. S10893-108943

  • Sept. 19, 1996:

Message on Senate action sent to the House.

  • Sept. 20, 1996

Enrolled Measure signed in Senate. Cong. Rec. S11089


Executive Action(s)

  • Sept. 18, 1996:


Cleared for White House.

  • Sept. 20, 1996:

Presented to President. Cong. Rec. H11045 (Sept. 24, 1996)

  • Oct. 2, 1996:

Signed by President
President's signing statement
Became Public Law No: 104-231 Cong. Rec. D1056 (Oct. 21, 1996)

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