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Whose Trade Organization?
A Comprehensive Guide to the WTO

 By Lori Wallach and Patrick Woodall of Public Citizen
Click here to order now!

Many people are surprised when they learn that trade is only a small element of the World Trade Organization (WTO). 

But the World Trade Organization - and the army of rules that it presides over - actually covers a huge array of subjects never included in trade agreements before.  The new agreements that were born with the WTO almost nine years ago included one-size-fits-all rules interfering with food safety standards, environmental laws, social service policies, intellectual property standards, government procurement rules, and more.

Whose Trade Organization? is the definitive guide to the nine-year reign of the undemocratic "trade" regime that has sparked protests from Seattle to Quebec to Genoa.  With case-by-case studies, the book exposes the lopsided agreements and secret tribunals that are the tools of the WTO's trade, and reveals the aggressive corporate agenda at its core.

Summaries of key findings:

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