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CAFTA Damage Report: Rep. Steven LaTourette (R-Ohio)

Representative LaTourette (R-Ohio-14) says his last minute flip-flop on the Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) to vote "yes" was done to obtain tariff cuts on Central American plywood for a local furniture company, but plywood from Central America has been duty-free for decades. Citizens of Ohio's 14th District are wondering how their Congressman could be so misinformed on a major piece of trade legislation.

PUBLIC CITIZEN NEWS RELEASES

NEWS ARTICLES ON LATOURETTE'S BAD CAFTA VOTE

  • "LaTourette attributes flip-flop on CAFTA to tariff no one pays," Cleveland Plain Dealer, August 10, 2005.
  • "Rep. LaTourette (R) too stupid to remain in Congress?" Talking Points Memo, August 10, 2005.
  • "House Democrats under pressure after votes for DR-CAFTA," Inside US Trade, August 12, 2005.
  • "CAFTA Contortionist: The embarrassing flip-flop of Steve LaTourette," Akron Beacon-Journal (OH), August 14, 2005.
  • "LaTourette voted on CAFTA before getting tariff report," Cleveland Plain Dealer, August 14, 2005.
  • "LaTourette's Pro-CAFTA Vote Adding to GOP's Woes," Columbus Dispatch, August 14, 2005.
  • "Hill Briefs: Trade," National Journal's Congress Daily, August 19, 2005
  • "Another Nail in Coffin of American Dream," Akron Beacon-Journal (Ohio), August 31, 2005.   

CONTACT REPRESENTATIVE LATOURETTE, AND LET HIM KNOW THAT HIS VOTE TO EXTEND NAFTA TO SIX MORE COUNTREIS WILL NOT GO UNNOTICED!

Call and ask to speak with a Trade Legislative Assistant, and tell them that Representative LaTourette's bad CAFTA vote is not supported by the citizens of Ohio's 14th District!

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